Special exhibitions


Special exhibition

April 1st, 2021 to September 5th, 2021

RESIST! The Art of Resistance

The special exhibition "RESIST! The Art of Resistance" explores different forms, moments and histories of resistance against colonialism and its current continuities.
To this end, the RJM invites curators and activists Peju Layiwola from Nigeria, Esther Utjiua Muinjangue & Ida Hoffmann from Namibia, Tímea Junghaus from Hungary and Elizaveta Khan & Mona Leitmeier from Cologne to curate their own spaces. These are complemented by objects from the RJM's collection, historical materials, personal testimonies, and works of contemporary art. The exhibition offers places for gathering, reflection and action through workshops in the exhibition space with an extensive program of events and mediation.

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Vorschau


Intervention

May 22, 2021 to July 4, 2021

ARTIST MEETS ARCHIVE: Yasmine Eid-Sabbagh

The Artist Meets Archive program will take place for the second time in May 2021 in cooperation with Photoszene Köln at the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum. The artist Yasmine Eid-Sabbagh, who explored the museum and the collection in the summer of 2020 for an artist residency program, will present her developed work in the museum's permanent exhibition. In doing so, the Rautenstrauch-Joest Museum will act as a central location for the Artists Meets Archive program. Among other things, there will be a central display for all five Artist Meets Archive artists.


Focus

May 28, 2021 to August 29, 2021

Invisible Inventories
On the Critique of Kenyan Collections in Western Museums

The planned exhibition "Invisible Inventories", takes place within the framework of a larger project, the "International Inventories Program": The "International Inventories Programme" artistically, scientifically and curatorially addresses the question of how Kenyan cultural assets currently held in institutions of the "Global North" can be made accessible in Kenya. To this end, they are being recorded in a comprehensive online database. As a continuously updated archive, this inventory creates the basis for a fact-based discussion of restitution issues. A later expansion of the database to other countries will be made possible. Since 2019, over 18,000 objects have already been collected in the database. Artists, scholars, and curators - such as those from the National Museums of Kenya (NMK) in Nairobi, the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum (RJM) in Cologne, the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt am Main, and the collectives The Nest (Kenya) and SHIFT (Germany) - are involved. A central aspect of the "International Inventories Programme" is provenance research on collections of Kenyan objects in museums and other institutions outside Kenya. The exhibition project "Invisible Inventories" is dedicated to this research by both scholars and artists. The exhibition is being developed collectively to capture the multifaceted perspectives and multiple narratives of Europe and Africa's interwoven colonial history. The resulting contemporary artworks, including video works and installations, as well as the results of the scholarly research, will be presented successively at the Nairobi National Museum, the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum, and the Weltkulturenmuseum in Frankfurt am Main (September 2021).


Special exhibition

October 7, 2021 to February 14, 2022

Love global
Between neurococktail and divine ecstasy

After Resist! The Art of Resistance, the RJM dedicates itself to Love! A playful-surprising exhibition with objects from the RJM collection, everyday objects, film and contemporary art, tells manifold stories: From love, friendship, morality, pain, connection, power, solidarity to social distancing in times of pandemic. The exhibition is created in collaboration with local and global actors.


Focus

November 5, 2021 to February 2, 2022

One Soul in All
Encounters with Ainu from the North of Japan

The exhibition "A Soul in Everything - Encounters with Ainu from the North of Japan", which can be seen from November 5, 2021 to February 20, 2022 at the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum - Kulturen der Welt, pays special attention to the cultures of the Ainu groups and their path to recognition. The Ainu groups are considered the indigenous inhabitants* of northern Japan, who originally lived as hunter-gatherer communities predominantly on the islands of Hokkaido and Sakhalin. From the mid-19th century, they were colonized, resettled and exploited by Japan. It was only after the mid-20th century that a strong return to their traditions emerged and a revitalization movement emerged, leading to recognition as an indigenous group in 2008 and its legal implementation by the Japanese government in 2019. In the exhibition, the main focus is on the current revival movement of Ainu groups with a variety of voices from Ainu representatives. Visitors also learn more about the history of the museum's collection, get a glimpse of beliefs and changing stereotypes, and get a glimpse of the beauty of material culture. A special highlight is an embroidered Ainu garment made of bark bast. The exhibition connects the past with the present, opens new perspectives and touches through the intensity of the many-sided "encounters". An exhibition in cooperation with the Ainu National Museum, Hokkaido and the Japan Foundation Cologne.

 
 

Special exhibitions

The large exhibition hall is used for a wide variety of special exhibitions and exciting programs.

Focus

In the "Focus" exhibition area, we continually shed new and critical light on our own collection in close cooperation with the communities of origin.

Intervention

In order to enliven our permanent exhibition, which opened in 2010, with new approaches and ideas, there are regular so-called "interventions". Sometimes small, sometimes large, thought and implemented by invited artists, students, associations or by ourselves.